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Reimagining International criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court Thursday 3rd December

Reimagining International criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court

Thursday 3rd December

  

Any future ad hoc international(ised) tribunal or investigative commission collecting evidence on its behalf, must fully comply with all procedural laws of the State where the crimes were alleged. Avoiding this obligation may superficially facilitate rapid evidence collection, but ultimately leads to wasted resources, delays in proceedings and substantial unfairness.
Geoff Roberts

The "International Community" should create a permanent structure to provide long-term (e.g.10-15 years) support for national trials of international crimes, providing help with issues such as legal reform, judicial sensitisation, investigations, experts, fundraising, outreach, and reparations. National trials are cheaper, faster, and more effective at delivering justice for survivors, but without committed support they always fizzle out.
Rupert Skilbeck

Since accountability is the ICC's leitmotif, the ICC should ensure that those impacted by its work can access remedies. When the ICC assumes jurisdiction over a State-situation, related ICC proceedings should be subject to the competence of regional and international human right mechanisms that exercise jurisdiction over that State.
Melinda Taylor

The arguments against seeking justice when atrocities are underway—it will complicate peace negotiations and cause perpetrators to dig in—are well-rehearsed but worn-out. When these excuses drive policy, atrocities mount, civilians suffer, and peace remains elusive. Next time, let's impose robust accountability immediately. Before it is too late.
Professor Beth van Schaak

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